New 38-storey commercial tower proposed for 205 North Quay

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Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD

A development application has been lodged for the development of a new 38 storey commercial tower by Cbus Property and Nielson Properties located at 205 North Quay in the CBD.

After a design competition was conducted, architects Hassell, with REX, New York, and Richards & Spence, Brisbane were selected.

According to the development application, 205 North Quay is designed through the lens of human experience – “of what it should mean to live and work well in the subtropics.”

“Verandahs, terraces and outdoor rooms are commonplace of subtropical design, their aesthetic provides us with an intermediary buffer, forming a third space – a place to retreat, to seek respite, make personal connections and link us with our cultural identity.” – Development Application.

Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the corner of the tower at North Quay and Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of the corner of the tower at North Quay and Herschel Street

Public design benefits:

  • The ground plane is unenclosed and dedicated to 100% public use with a new ground-level urban plaza.
  • The establishment of a new laneway facilitates direct access from North Quay to Herschel Street.
  • The existing Energex easement has the potential to extend as a public laneway to Makerston Street and beyond, at a future date, thereby creating a more pedestrian-friendly and connected city.
  • The retail proposal activates this assumed laneway and sets up this potential future pedestrian link.
  • The ground plane steps up to a new riverside restaurant – extending the effect of the ground plane to a space that recognises North Quay as a major traffic arterial.
  • The building lobby is raised two floors, over the restaurant, to similarly gain access to river views as well as release the ground floor to encourage public access and use.
  • The provision of an auditorium space as part of the ‘public realm’ of the tower creates many opportunities for the city to engage with the building.
  • The proposal limits vehicular access from Herschel Street to private vehicles and locates access to loading facilities to North Quay, to release the ground plane as a publically accessible space, thereby creating a more pedestrian-friendly relationship to Herschel Street.
  • The public plaza is a platform that facilitates a programmatic overlay. A space that can link to existing events programs or be the catalyst for new programs.
Architectural rendering looking down at public plaza of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering looking down at public plaza of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering looking down at public plaza of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering looking up from public plaza of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of proposed auditorium at 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the proposed auditorium at 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of rooftop terrace at 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of rooftop terrace at 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD

Arcadia Landscape Architecture also worked in close collaboration with the design team across all levels of the building, including the public plaza, restaurant precinct, sky terraces, and roof terrace.

Multiple ‘city rooms’ are proposed within the public realm of the tower which includes the new ground floor plaza, a grand star up to a restaurant on level two, an auditorium space on level two, and a rooftop terrace.

A full ‘wellbeing level’ has been proposed on level 2 of the development which includes a gym, wellness studio, shower facilities and open-air 25-metre lap pool.

Sketch of outdoor 25 metre pool as part of 205 North Quay
Sketch of outdoor 25 metre pool as part of 205 North Quay
Architectural rendering of looking out from 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of looking out from 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD

Development rundown

  • Tower Site Cover: Approximately 69% of site area
  • Gross Floor Area (GFA): 61,893.50sqm (88,981.7sqm GBA)
  • Maximum Building Height: 38 storeys / RL 186.100m
  • Maximum Podium Height: 2 storeys
  • Green Plot Ratio:
    ▪ Plaza: 1,506sqm
    ▪ Terraces: 1,036sqm
    ▪ Roof Terrace: 337sqm
    ▪ Approx. 97%
  • Community Plot Ratio
    ▪ Ground: 1,755sqm
    ▪ P01: 634sqm
    ▪ P02: 658sqm
    ▪ Level 1: 1,786sqm
    ▪ Level 2: 1,552sqm
    ▪ Terraces: 1,036sqm
    ▪ Roof Terrace: 951sqm
    ▪ Approx. 283%
  • Car Parking: 116 car spaces (including 2 PWD spaces), plus 2 motorcycle spaces at basement level 3
  • End-of-trip Facilities (Bicycle Parking, Lockers and Showers): An end-of-trip facility is proposed within basement 1 and will accommodate:
    390 bicycle parking space. Access to the proposed end-of-trip facility is provided via a dedicated access from Herschel Street
  • Level two childcare centre.
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of the facade design of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of one of the sky terraces of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of one of the sky terraces of 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD

Gold elliptical sun-shading devices shown on the facade are proposed to the North West and South East facades providing horizontal and vertical sun shading. While vertical sun-shades to the shorter end facade are proposed facing North East and South West.

Architectural rendering of looking out from 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD
Architectural rendering of looking out from 205 North Quay, Brisbane CBD

‘Grand Central’ precinct

“With the addition of a new high capacity underground station and metro service, Roma Street will become our State’s most significant transport interchange and Brisbane’s ‘Grand Central’, connecting passengers with the existing suburban bus and rail networks, as well as regional and interstate bus and train services. ‘Grand Central Station’ will be the only station in the Brisbane CBD connecting the greater region including the Sunshine Coast, Redlands, Ipswich and the Gold Coast.” – Hassell REX Richards and Spence.

According to the architects, 205 North Quay will be targeting a 6 star Green Star and 5.5 star NABERS rating.

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Planning & Development Online is A005493795.

Floor plates

 

5 COMMENTS

  1. I’m glad this part of the city is finally seeing some love, but I find the monolithic nature of the tower a little uninspiring.

    I also wonder if it will ever go ahead, given the approved development at the corner of herschel and roma street still hasn’t gone anywhere…

  2. The ground floor plane has a lot of dead space – there is little street activation. It would be better to consolidate the vehicle entrances into one.

    The frontage on North Quay is a blank wall and we don’t need another “urban plaza” that no one will use. It’s a poor urban design outcome.

    There should be a more active street front and less dominant vehicles and services. It’s a pity they couldn’t turn the Energex easement into a true laneway that access could come off.

  3. It could become a real wellness hub in the area, as a lot of pedestrians, cyclists, joggers and walkers use the area. It provides a destination, with the level 2 facilities, and a pleasant experience for people experiencing the cultural centre, bridges and surrounds.

  4. So, after a big competition involving a handful of international starchitecture firms – SOM, REX, WOHA & SHoP, the result is a building that looks like the sort of thing that would be designed for President Trump.
    Those elliptical sunshades are going to be pretty ineffective on the facade facing NW, so the AC system will need to soak up a ton of heat in summer. Hence why Donovan Hill’s Santos building down the road has its whole NW facade covered with proper screening, a much more sensible idea.

  5. It’s just a big rectangular box. Surely all these architects could dream up something with more aesthetic interest for the skyline.

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