Final Breakfast Creek Bridge Design Revealed Ahead of Construction Start

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Architectural rendering of new Breakfast Creek bridge
Architectural rendering of new Breakfast Creek bridge

The final design for the Breakfast Creek Green Bridge has been released, with construction of the key piece of Olympics infrastructure to start early next year.

Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said the final design showed how the new bridge would link with an extended Lores Bonney Riverwalk.

“Our bridge will connect business and employment opportunities in Newstead, Teneriffe, Fortitude Valley and the city centre with growing lifestyle precincts including Northshore Hamilton and Racecourse Road,” Cr Schrinner said.

“This bridge will deliver a lasting legacy as we set our sights on what will be required for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Architectural rendering of entrance to Newstead Park
Architectural rendering of entrance to Newstead Park
Architectural rendering of pedestrian and cycle paths in Newstead Park
Architectural rendering of pedestrian and cycle paths in Newstead Park

“Come 2032, this bridge will be used by athletes, residents and visitors as tens of thousands of people descend on our city while Brisbane hosts the biggest sporting event in the world.

“While the games may be 11 years away, I committed to fast-tracking this critical piece of infrastructure because providing better connections along our river will make Brisbane an even better place to live.

“We are investing heavily in improving transport connections ahead of 2032 and this includes our other new green bridge at Kangaroo Point, which we will start construction on later this year.

Architectural rendering of Newstead Park landing
Architectural rendering of Newstead Park landing
Architectural rendering of Newstead Park landing
Architectural rendering of Newstead Park landing

“These bridges will give residents and visitors more options to ditch their cars, with the Breakfast Creek Green Bridge able to be used to access the new athletes’ village and the Kangaroo Point Green Bridge there for people to get to a redeveloped Gabba Stadium.

Cr Schrinner said the final design for Breakfast Creek has been reached following extensive community consultation, during which around 800 people had their say, as well as detailed investigations completed on site.

“This project will deliver new and improved paths for pedestrians and cyclists with the added bonus of incredible river views,” he said.

Architectural rendering of bridge underpass and seating
Architectural rendering of bridge underpass and seating
Architectural rendering of pause point
Architectural rendering of pause point

“It will collectively provide approximately 800 metres of new and improved paths for pedestrians and cyclists to use for both commuting and recreation.

“We’re extending the Lores Bonney Riverwalk by 175 metres and proposing a new two-way on-road cycle path from the bridge landing at Newstead Park through to Newstead Terrace at Halford Street, via Breakfast Creek Road and Newstead Avenue.

“This new connection will provide a safe, separate ongoing connection to the inner city and CBD and avoid the need for commuters and sport cyclists to travel through Newstead Park.

“A key focus of the final design has been to complement the area’s heritage and landscape setting by minimising impacts to existing views of Newstead House and Park and the Brisbane River, with an arch bridge span featuring colours inspired by the leaves of the surrounding Moreton Bay fig trees.”

Cr Schrinner said delivering this bridge would support 140 local jobs during construction, with the contract to construct being awarded and works due to commence early next year.

Community information sessions will be held in the local area in late October 2021 to provide an opportunity for residents and business owners to meet the project team, ask questions and learn more about the final design for the bridge, its ongoing connections and construction timing.

  • Saturday 23 October 2021, 9am to 12noon at Newstead Park
  • Wednesday 27 October 2021, 4pm to 6pm at Cameron Rocks Reserve.

Architectural design

43 %

Building amenities

63 %

Building greenery (Buildings that breathe)

73 %

Public realm / Street activation

70 %

Sustainability

70 %

By 06 reviewer(s)

  • Avatar

    Michael Dart

    Its not a nice looking bridge and really isn’t needed. I get that the current pathway needs an update but building a bridge that spans that small distance is just a wait of money.

    Why not upgrade the current path along the road?

    October 29, 2021

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  • Avatar

    Greg

    Of all the existing river crossings to duplicate, they’re going with the Merivale Bridge?!?

    Why add another eye-sore to the river line? The only thing that could be worse is if the bridge is painted grey.

    October 21, 2021

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  • Avatar

    Ray

    I agree with the other comments that the arch is unnecessary and it becomes the landmark when the bridge should blend into the area’s landscape not standout.

    October 20, 2021

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  • Avatar

    Dan

    Agree with Jon and Rod.

    First impression was the arch and bridge alignment will detract from the area. Feel it would tie-in better if it attempted to aligned with the breakfast creek road bridge perhaps with a larger sweeping radius.

    Make the bridge as invisible as possible as Jon says.

    October 19, 2021

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  • Avatar

    Rod 199350

    My review aligns with Jon.

    The very first thing I noticed was how the bridge arch will impact on the view of Newstead House etc

    The arch is not necessary.

    Other than that the project design looks good.

    October 19, 2021

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  • Avatar

    Jon Bergholtz

    Why does the bridge have an arch for such a short span? This arch interferes with the view of Newstead House and the park and generally doesn’t fit in, is an arch necessary for a foot bridge?This bridge, in my view, should be as invisible as possible.

    October 19, 2021

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Architectural design
Building amenities
Building greenery (Buildings that breathe)
Public realm / Street activation
Sustainability