New Super-tall Tower Proposed for Queen Street Mall

Queen-street-mall-residential-tower
Artist's impression of No.1 Brisbane tower design from Brisbane Square

A development application has been submitted for a new 81 storey residential tower known as No.1 Brisbane.

Located on the corner of George & Queen Street, the proposal represents the first Australian residential apartment building to be situated directly on a CBD shopping strip and would feature views over the Treasury Building towards the future Queen’s Wharf IRD.

Designed by Blight Rayner Architecture, the applicant behind this proposal is 151 Property Core Plus Management Limited on behalf of The Trust Company Limited who are the owners of the current commercial buildings on site at 231 George Street and 52 Queen Street.

According to the development application, the building aims to be a ‘breathable’ green ‘vertical city’ of self contained communities.

No.1 Brisbane is another tower that scrapes Brisbane’s artificial maximum height limit of 274.3m AHD. An ongoing CASA restriction due to a Brisbane Airport radar location issue means that new residential towers in Brisbane’s CBD can only be built up to this height.

Artist’s impression of No.1 Brisbane from George Street
No.1 Brisbane south bank
Artist’s impression of No.1 Brisbane from South Bank
Sketch of proposed retail and residential tower

The tower consists of 534 residential apartments with the following configuration:

Configuration

  • x120 One bedroom apartments
  • x284 Two bedroom apartments
  • x108 Three bedroom apartments
  • x20 Four bedroom apartments
  • x2 Penthouses

No.1 Brisbane’s outdoor spaces vary in scale and volume from top to bottom. They include:

  • A new cross block link
  • Eroded ground plan spaces for rest, shade and landscape
  • A podium designed as the ‘great verandah’ with various public opportunities to occupy behind a facade system that allows indoor and outdoor spaces
  • Top of podium landscaped and retail spaces
  • Recreation facilities that provide sky terraces
  • Balconies to apartments up to level 30 and pop out windows controlling the environmental conditions from level 35 up
Artist’s impression of future Burnett Lane

Retail & Podium

The podium is designed as a fully active street building with a series of connected retail spaces. The proposed plan allows the public to move not only across the site but also up through the site via a series of voids and escalations culminating at the landscaped podium top.

Artist’s impression of No.1 Brisbane’s retail podium and cross block link

The proposed scale aligns with the adjoining heritage building to continue the Queen Street scale. A light filled laneway connecting Burnett Lane to Queen Street will reveal the neighbouring heritage building’s corner and side boundary historic brick wall.

All podium levels will comprise of retail, food and beverage uses to activate the edge and increase the depth of Queen Street Mall.

The podium design provides for increased connectivity, permeability and activation of Burnett Lane, through the provision of the public laneway arcade through the site connecting Queen Street Mall and Burnett Lane as well as the continuation of uses unique to a laneway setting including boutique urban cafes, bars and galleries.

The podium also intends to incorporate a number of public outdoor, recreational spaces, including the prominent ‘Great Verandah’ that visually connects the proposed podium with the surrounding public realm, including the Queen Street Mall, Reddacliff Place and South Bank.

Artist’s impression of ‘The Great Veranda’ inside the podium level

Recreational Areas & Floor Plates

Proposed recreation space is located throughout the tower in order to maximise accessibility to all residents.

The recreational spaces will provide communal facilities including BBQ areas, Function and Media Rooms, Gym facilities and Pool areas to further facilitate the concept of a Vertical City, comprising an overall floor area of 4,470m2.

The DA number for this development is A004673366.

REVIEW OVERVIEW
Design & Architecture
92 %
Location & Public Transport
98 %
Street Activation
95 %
Sustainable/Green Initiatives
91 %
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9 COMMENTS

  1. Another nsil into the coffin of creating inner city into vallies of shadows. Has a impact study been done on shadows it will cast. The idea of the Queen St Shopping mall is to create open spaces of fresh air and sunlight. Seems that natural sunlight will be replaced by shadows.
    Traffic conjestion during construction in that area is already bad enough without adding to it.
    A very bad move by BCC to consider any approval for a building of this size for this site

  2. Unbelievable Tallingly beautiful building!! Bring on Brisbane watch out Sydney and Melbourne!! Brisbane N. 1 City of Australia!!

  3. Something needs to be done to rejuvenate the southern end of the mall. Retail has struggled with the demand focused on spaces between the Albert St Mall & the end of the Queen St Mall onto Edward Street. Will be short term pain during development (if approved and gets funding). Now all we need is for ISPT and Vicinity to get their act together and redevelop the Myer Centre into something reminiscent of what it was during the 80’s and 90’s – the focal point for retail in the Brisbane CBD

  4. I would expect a development-oriented web site like this to use well-establish tall building terminology more precisely – specifically “supertall” is a term reserved for buildings over 300 m, but less than 600 m. Beyond that the term “megatall” is used (see CTBUH website). This is clearly a tall building, but not a “supertall” one.

    The “fun fact” rant on parking spaces explains to me why we have such horrendous parking problems in the city-proximate suburbs of Brisbane. Like many, I use public transport to get to work, but I still have a car for weekend or evening use. Units without allocated carparks just cause frustration with on street parking (explore the ill-planned disasters that are Teneriffe or Newstead). That “fun fact” is a short sighted ideological philosophy that only brings a smile to the developers face. Adequate parking is essential to the urban residential projects.

    • I would have to agree with you that adequate resident parking is vital to avoid parking issues in inner city areas, hence why the “antiquated” policy is in place.
      A lot of work needs to be done for Brisbane to become less car centric, most notably making public transport more convenient, reliable, accessible and cost effective, not removing parking from residences who need it.

  5. Wow. Another unit building for subtropical brisbane, that, apart from some facade planting, appears to provide little subtropical design for the units themselves. The south and west facing units will be airconditioned (or heated) glazed boxes barely liveable on a summer’s afternoon, and rec areas aren’t well located on the west with pools on the south/south-east. What happened to opening windows and big balconies? There seems to be a trend for these awning windows that don’t give good genuine openings and look like they’ll just funnel hot rising city air into the units.

  6. Yep – this just clearly came across as an excuse to save costs./increase profit.
    I’m all for Tall/Supertall residential, but do it properly.

    I would specifically avoid any development without adequate parking as a buyer or resident.

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