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Brisbane Needs an East-West Mass Rapid Transit

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east west mass rapid transit
Brisbane East West Mass Rapid Transit Concept. Source: DesignworksUSA of Siemens Klang Valley MRT Kuala Lumpur.
Brisbane East West Mass Rapid Transit Concept. Source: DesignworksUSA of Siemens Klang Valley MRT Kuala Lumpur.

Opinion: Now is the time to plan a useful public infrastructure project that will benefit Brisbane into the long term. Short term thinking on infrastructure planning should be weeded out and bipartisan convergence of mass transit planning from all political parties is needed.

One of the most critical infrastructure projects that we believe Brisbane needs, along with Cross River Rail and the planned Brisbane Metro is a new high frequency East-West mass rapid transit line to connect Brisbane’s burgeoning inner city growth areas, otherwise our surface streets will see overwhelming car and bus gridlock within the next decade.

The dawn of the 21st century has seen Brisbane transform the way we build our housing. Once allowed to sprawl as far as the Taylor Ranges to the West and to Moreton Bay in the East, Brisbane is continuing to build upwards and attached, infill dwellings now account for most of new greater Brisbane dwelling construction.

This new type of densified growth has notably been concentrated along a 10km East-West axis. Growth now follows an East-West path of desirability along the snaking Brisbane River.

The East-West Mass Rapid Transit

East-west growth axis
East-West Growth Axis

Interactive Map

Zoom into map to see possible route alignment.

Station Directory

Click on stations to see more information.

East-West mass transit explained

  • A 12.8 kilometre underground driverless metro line
  • x4 underground river crossings
  • x15 underground stations
  • Target capacity of around 40,000 customers per hour, similar to other metro systems worldwide
  • Linking Queensland’s largest university to the rest of the city
  • Finally providing Northshore Hamilton with access to mass transit
  • Linking Brisbane’s highest density areas, most of which have no access to mass transit
Artist's impression of interior of Siemens KVMRT Metro
Artist’s impression of interior of Siemens KVMRT Metro

Using an overlay of Brisbane Development Map data, we can summarise that around 43,400 dwellings have been recently completed, under construction, proposed, approved or mooted within a 450m radius of fifteen stations along a blue line linking the University of Queensland to Northshore Hamilton.

Using a conservative multiplier of x1.6 persons per apartment dwelling, an estimated 70,000 new residents will reside within this east-west corridor of inner Brisbane, on top of existing residents, new student residents, and new office workers.

These figures are conservative and do not include populations of student accommodation, hotel rooms, aged care facilities or new commercial space, so this final figure is likely to be a lot higher.

New world cities need long term visions and even with Cross River Rail and Brisbane Metro, Brisbane is playing catchup. The Brisbane City Council is correct to upgrade parts of the existing North-South busway into a metro line, however to avoid total gridlock and an engrained car culture of inner city areas outside of this existing Busway, we need to properly service additional high density growth areas with a dedicated high frequency underground metro line.

A similar, much longer driverless system which is currently under construction in Sydney is explained below:

Costs

Deriving the costs of a barely mapped out system with so many potential variables is almost like looking into a crystal ball. However by analysing a whole range of proposed, under construction or recently completed metro systems in the world, we can begin to understand the costs per kilometre in order to ascertain a rough total figure for a 12.8km East-West metro for Brisbane.

International Metro Infrastructure Construction
International Metro Infrastructure Construction

The three closest systems with similar market conditions and labour costs to that of Brisbane are Sydney Metro, Singapore’s Thomson MRT Line and Singapore’s Downtown MRT Line. When averaged, these projects represent an cost of $412 million per kilometre.

Using this vague but straightforward method of comparison, we can predict that if using similar driverless metro technology and construction methods, similar to that of the Sydney and Singapore lines, a 12.8km East-West Metro connecting Brisbane’s most dense areas would cost somewhere between $4 to $6 billion (exact averaged figure is $5.2 billion).

Funding

With traditional funding methods lethargically inhibiting vital existing projects like Cross River Rail from commencing, such a project of this nature requires non-traditional, innovative sources of revenue that utilise value capture, the private sector and public money.

Possible non-traditional funding methods
Possible non-traditional funding methods
Value Capture

Value Capture is method of infrastructure revenue raising which identifies and collects an equitable portion of the increased land values caused by new infrastructure improvements. For example, new property wealth that is generated as a direct benefit of a nearby mass transit station would be tapped in order to help fund and spread increased wealth to the broader community.

Value capture explained. Source: Value Capture Roadmap by AECOM, Consult Australia
Value capture explained. Source: Value Capture Roadmap by AECOM, Consult Australia

report by Aecom and Consult Australia explains that value capture is not a new tax. It allocates the uplift in benefits from public investments in ways that do not affect current or future tax rates.

The report highly recommends the use of value capturing mechanisms for new Australian infrastructure. First used in North America in the 1960’s, Australia has never really used this type of funding method, instead relying on higher taxes, public handouts and new levies.

International experience demonstrates that well planned public transport can increase land values by up to 50% and can contribute substantial portions of the overall cost of new infrastructure.

The Denver Union Station redevelopment captured $135 million of its $446 million cost (roughly 30%) of the total capital cost through value capture.

Another example of value capture, this one an extreme case is the MTR in Hong Kong, which is 100% funded by property development gains. MTR Corporation acquires land for new stations and development sites around stations are then leased at higher values with new mass transit infrastructure in place. Although Brisbane has no where near the density and population levels of Hong Kong, our densifying inner city areas most certainly can allow a good enough percentage of capital costs to come from the value capture method.

PPP (Public Private Partnership).

While PPP ventures of large scale infrastructure projects in Queensland have had a rocky and controversial past due to the collapse of two roadway consortiums in Brisbane, Pubic Private Partnerships of public transport infrastructure overall has been quite successful, with Goldlinq Consortium being a good example of this success.

In it’s first year of operation, the 13km Gold Coast Rapid Transit exceeded it’s original 5.70 million forecast to reach 6.18 million trips while boosting the city’s public transport patronage by 25%. Goldlinq is now part of a 7.3km expansion project which will connect the light rail system to heavy rail.

An East-West line, taking people where they want to go will equally be as successful and could attract domestic and international corporations like Singapore’s successful MRT corporation to invest in such a line.

Public Bond Raising

Government issued bonds for infrastructure investment is nothing new and has been used to build public infrastructure projects throughout the world.

The governing authority in charge of establishing a hypothetical investment vehicle for East-West Rapid Transit could in essence create an easier method for the public to invest in fixed rate government bonds.

Through the use of technology which is largely available to everyone such as a smart phone application, everyday people could be enticed to invest into government treasury bonds which are a predictable, long-term source of income rather than lower interest term deposit accounts. Additionally, these infrastructure bonds could be issued as tax-exempt bonds which would make them a highly attractive investment for a lot of people.

It starts with an idea

Brisbane is at a crossroad. We are fast approaching a critical mass of population within our inner city areas to sustain a more serious long term form of mass transit. With the inevitable population growth in areas mentioned earlier, in 10-15 years time politicians will be calling for a project of this nature. So why wait for when we actually need it to start planning it?

Long term infrastructure should not be seen as a ‘distraction’ to current projects like Cross River Rail or Brisbane Metro, but more of a sustainable investment and careful way of planning for the needs of tomorrow so that one day we won’t be scrambling at the 11th hour to cure gridlock problems and pay higher amounts for shorter construction periods.

If a hypothetical project like an East-West Mass Rapid Transit system was ever contemplated, it should utilise innovative but calculated methods of funding, so that it doesn’t cost the world. More importantly however, such a system should absorb good ideas from successful projects across the globe.

As for the future, your task is not to forsee it, but to enable it.
– Antoine de Saint Exupery, poet and pilot (1900-1944)

Kangaroo Point Green Bridge begins to take shape

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Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation

The Kangaroo Point Green Bridge project has reached a key milestone with the successful installation of its first steel bridge deck span, connecting the CBD landing site at Alice Street and Edward Street to the first bridge pier.

Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner expressed his excitement for the project and the impact it will have on Brisbane.

“The Kangaroo Point Green Bridge will be a Brisbane icon when finished, with images of the bridge and its striking 83-metre mast certain to become synonymous with our city in the years to come,” said Schrinner.

“The over-water restaurant and café that we have incorporated into the project will also make the bridge a must-do destination for residents and visitors,” he added. “Wherever I go in Brisbane, people are keen to know more about this fantastic project, so it’s great we can start the year by announcing the bridge has reached this key milestone.”

Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation

Schrinner also spoke about the practical benefits of the bridge, saying, “The bridge will provide a critical link between a redeveloped Gabba Stadium and the CBD, particularly during the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.”

With four more bridge spans to be installed by mid-2023 and pre-cast concrete deck panels to be fitted into place, the project is moving forward at a fast pace.

Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation
Kangaroo Point bridge span installation

The bridge is expected to be completed in 2024 and to be used by over 6,000 pedestrians, cyclists, and e-mobility riders daily by 2036, potentially reducing car trips across the river by up to 84,000 each year.

“Most of the marine piling works have now been completed and will be followed by concrete pours for the marine piers, which will support the bridge from underneath,” said Schrinner. The project is being delivered on behalf of Connect Brisbane, a consortium of bridge design, engineering, and construction specialists led by BESIX Watpac.

Construction Commences on Brisbane’s Tallest Office Tower

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Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development

Construction work for the first stage of the Waterfront Brisbane project, a joint development by Dexus and the Dexus Wholesale Property Fund (DWPF), has officially commenced with builder John Holland Group now on site.

The project is expected to cost around $2.5 billion and aims to develop a business and leisure destination of global standards, leveraging its prime riverside location in Brisbane, Australia.

The Waterfront Brisbane project is poised to revitalise the Eagle Street precinct and create public spaces with river views and improved links between the river and the city streets.

The existing Eagle Street Pier restaurant complex will be replaced by two new office towers and premium riverfront retail, which hopes to become an iconic riverside destination that will include a wider section of riverwalk and improved connections to the city.

Image of the current Eagle Street Pier structures which will soon be demolished
Image of the current Eagle Street Pier structures which will soon be demolished
Image of the current Eagle Street Pier structures which will soon be demolished
Image of the current Eagle Street Pier structures which will soon be demolished

The taller north tower is to be constructed first, with the south tower being built at a later date.

Tower 1, also referred to as the North Tower will become Brisbane’s tallest commercial tower ever built (to the roof level), soaring to 236m and beating the current tallest commercial tower, 1 William Street by 10 metres.

Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development

The development has been designed by Fjmt and Arkhefield and aims to become a modern precinct for flexible working and socialising.

The Waterfront Brisbane project has received strong interest from organisations seeking a quality future workplace in Brisbane.

Professional services firms such as Deloitte, Minter Ellison, Gadens, and Colliers have already identified it as their future home, with 45% of the first tower’s office space already committed.

Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development

The construction program is expected to be delivered over five years and will include the basement, riverwalk, public realm, retail pavilions, common podium, and the north tower.

Dexus and John Holland Group are implementing construction and transport management plans to minimise disruption during the construction process.

The riverwalk will be temporarily closed as part of the construction program, while one south-bound lane on Eagle Street will be closed on weekdays during construction hours. The lane will remain open outside of construction hours on weekdays and weekends.

Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development

John Holland Group has set a goal to recycle 90% of the material that leaves the site by sorting timber, metals, and concrete. This approach to sustainable construction is becoming increasingly common in the construction industry and is aimed at reducing waste and preserving the environment.

In addition to minimising disruption and promoting sustainable construction, Dexus and John Holland Group are also committed to keeping the community informed about the progress of the project.

The Waterfront Brisbane app is available on the Apple App Store and Google Play and provides updates on the project’s progress and important information for the community.

Architectural rendering of Dexus' $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development
Architectural rendering of Dexus’ $2.5 Billion Waterfront Brisbane development

With construction officially underway, completion is expected to be around five years.

Click here to read an in-depth DA analysis of Waterfront Brisbane.

New Annex Building Proposed for Gold Tower

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Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects

A development application has been submitted by Marquette Properties for the construction of a eight storey Annex building located adjacent to the Gold Tower at 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD.

Designed by Cavill Architects, the proposal involves replacing the existing ancillary annex structure with a contemporary low-scale development which would provide 5,710m2 of commercial space as well as retail tenancies and public realm upgrades.

The design of the Annex building seeks to compliment the modernism displayed in the Gold Tower building. The design mirrors the gold facade colour of the parent tower and features curved edge profiles, clear and reflecting glazing.

The development also includes a new two storey retail tenancy situated on the northern corner of the site as well as two smaller retail tenancies along Market Street.

Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects
Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects
Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects
Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects
Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects
Architectural rendering of 10 Eagle Street, Brisbane CBD by Marquette Properties & Cavill Architects

Project Rundown

  • Site Area: 3477m2
  • GFA: Annex – 5,710m2, Gold Tower extension – 992m2 (total 6,702m²)
  • Height: Annex building height – 8 storeys (42.47m AHD at rooftop)
  • Elevators: x2 elevators
  • Retail: A new 595m2 two storey retail tenancy planned for north of the site as well as a 62m2 tenancy on the Market Street side. Another tenancy is located under the Annex building on Market Street however this appears to be connected to the building’s end-of-trip facilities
  • Communal Space: No communal space planned apart from ground level landscaping
  • Car Parking: Existing Car Parking Total = 247 spaces. Proposed Car Parking Total = 235 spaces. Difference = Net decrease of 12 car parking spaces
  • Bike Parking: 51 (Annex EOT)
  • Developer: Marquette Properties
  • Architect: Cavill Architects
  • Landscape Design: LatStudios
  • Town Planner: Urbis
  • Sustainability: Minimal sustainability initiatives. The proposal does incorporate some landscape integration throughout the site including rooftop plantings. There is no planned rooftop solar PV system or rainwater harvesting.
  • Date Submitted: 22/12/2022

The building is located across the road from Dexus’ Brisbane Waterfront development which would see two new commercial towers built with ground level retail as well as widening the riverfront promenade.

Plans

Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006181168.

Subscribe to BrisbaneDevelopment.com here.

44-Storey Office Tower Proposed for Herschel Street

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Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street

A development application has been submitted by Capricorn Asset Management Pty Ltd for a 44-storey commercial office tower located at 33 Herschel Street, Brisbane City.

The building would accommodate 15,090m2 of commercial GFA across 39 storeys from levels 4 to 41.

Designed by Bureau Proberts, the site’s 20 metre frontage gives the tower a slender 11.5 metre width.

A large 321m2 gym is proposed on level 3 which includes bike storage, repair and lockers.

Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street

According to the development application, the tower would transform the currently underutilised site, to establish tower at the northern gateway entrance into Brisbane’s CBD, which is designed commensurate to the site’s context, and which provides a “striking design outcome” for the site.

Additionally, the size and layout of the commercial offering facilitates contemporary and boutique tenancies which are designed in response to recent market trends and demand for office spaces.

Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street

“The podium is designed to be the prominent entry statement into the building, through a combination of large floor to ceiling heights above the lobby; and a mezzanine level which provides additional offerings overlooking the streetscape and lobby. The commercial and retail spaces are designed to cater for a range of tenants to provide the CBD with a variety of businesses and professional services.” – Urbis

Project Rundown

  • Site Area: 583.31m2 (64.03% of site area)
  • GFA: 18,488.38m2, comprising x15,090.13m² commercial space, x3,398.25m2 EOT/Gym/Store/Amenities.
  • Height: 44 storeys / RL 186.3m
  • Elevators: x3 elevators
  • Retail: Retail space in podium levels
  • Communal Space: A five storey podium (including a mezzanine) which includes an activated ground floor and mezzanine, through various retail and dining offers, with the above levels of the podium providing additional retail opportunities and a gym
  • Car Parking: x72 spaces, including two (2) PWD spaces, x5 motorbike spaces
  • Bike Parking: x145 spaces, comprising x100 staff spaces, x45 visitor spaces
  • Developer: Capricorn Asset Management Pty Ltd
  • Architect: Bureau Proberts
  • Landscape Design: Urbis
  • Town Planner: Urbis
  • Sustainability: Edge planters on the side of the building. No rooftop solar PV system. No rainwater harvesting.
  • Date Submitted: 13/12/2022
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street podium
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street podium
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street side gardens
Architectural rendering of 33 Herschel Street side gardens

Plans

App A - Proposed Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006169158.

Subscribe to BrisbaneDevelopment.com here.

BTR Residential Tower Proposed for Constance Street, Fortitude Valley

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Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley

A development application has been submitted by Constance50 Pty Ltd for a 31-storey Build-to-Rent (BTR) development located at 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley.

While mostly a BTR development project, the tower also includes 1,700m2 of commercial office space, 619m2 of ground floor retail and 872m2 for indoor sport and recreation, with the indoor sport and recreation space providing 24-hour access to residents and also external customers.

Designed by BVN, the building would accommodate 327 apartments comprising 50 studio units, 128 one-bedroom units, 75 two-bedroom units, and 74 three-bedroom units. According to the development application this mix directly supports housing choice and diversity.

The project features a unique white perforated, light reflective facade which runs up the entirety of the tower.

Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley
Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley

“The curved sculptural tower form, coupled with fluted façade, bespoke window shading and subtropical landscaping creates a decorative, yet dynamic street presence, promoting natural ventilation and lighting.” – BVN

Level 04 contains a variety of residential amenities, including a gym, lounge area, ‘Work From Home’ recreation zone and the residential management office. The consolidation of these services on this level ensures residents have ease of access to services.

Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley
Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley
Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley
Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley

Project rundown

  • Site Area: 2,781m2
  • GFA: 40,135m2
  • Height: 31-storeys / 112m
  • Apartments:  128 x one-bedroom apartments, 75 x two-bedroom apartments, 74 x three-bedroom apartments, 50 x studio apartments. Total apartments = 327
  • Elevators: x4 elevators for residential tower (lift-to-unit ratio of 1:82).
  • Retail: 619m2 of ground floor retail across three retail tenancies
  • Communal Space: 1,676m2, comprising: 908m2 communal outdoor space and 768m2 of rooftop communal recreational area.
  • Car Parking: 414 car parking spaces
  • Bike Parking: 457
  • Developer: Constance5 PTY LTD
  • Architect: BVN
  • Landscape Design: Lat Studio
  • Town Planner: Urbis

    Proposed sustainability initiatives
    Proposed sustainability initiatives
  • Sustainability: Significant sustainability initiatives. Deep plantings and gardens throughout development. A large rooftop solar PV array is proposed for common area energy consumption. Rainwater harvesting and large active transport component with commercial grade end of trip facilities. The building would include 5 star WELL rated fittings and fixtures and green concrete to the core.
  • Date Submitted: 8/12/2022

The rooftop space includes a bar and games room, pool and sun deck, dining room and kitchen, and BBQ areas.

The rooftop landscaping plan
The rooftop landscaping plan

This application replaces a previously approved development application for a taller 132m 25-storey commercial tower.

Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley
Architectural rendering of the BVN designed 50 Constance Street, Fortitude Valley

The podium of the tower would feature dappled light and illuminated screenings at night with the roof to feature an illuminated crown and illuminated base.

This is one of a number of new built-to-rent towers being proposed in the Fortitude Valley and Newstead area.

Plans

Proposed Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006165119.

Subscribe to BrisbaneDevelopment.com here.

A Look Into GPT’s Final Tower for Riverside Centre Precinct

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Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

GPT Group has submitted a development application for a 26-storey commercial office tower located within the CBD’s golden triangle at 135 Eagle Street.

If approved, the tower would constitute the last available site within the Harry Seidler designed Riverside Centre precinct.

According to architects Cameron & Co and Cox, Seidler’s original master plan positioned the now heritage Riverside Centre amongst a group of three other towers, two of which were to the south (now Riparian Plaza, also by Harry Seidler and OneOneOne Eagle by Cox Architecture).

One tower, smaller in scale than the Riverside Centre, was proposed to the north within the same plaza precinct, with low-level built form spilling outward over the Brisbane River.

Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

The proposed plan involves completing this original vision by replacing the low-level restaurants and bars with the new tower and retail plaza.

The commercial tower is shorter in nature and has a stepping down design to preserve the scale and minimise impact to the Riverside Centre.

Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

Each floor of the tower would be framed by planter beds with the final level of the tower comprising of plant equipment, an extensive roof garden and drone landing pad.

A large outdoor terrace and garden is proposed for level six.

Architectural rendering of the lobby of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of the lobby of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

The lobby itself is designed to be experienced as a soaring and expansive space, generous and uncluttered, creating room to pause and breathe between the street and the office.

The lobby can be approached and entered from Eagle Street, Riverside Plaza or from the public walkway past new restaurants through to the adjoining 145 Eagle Street riverfront dining terraces.

Architectural rendering of the ground level plaza of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of the ground level plaza of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

Fronting the river at plaza level is a new array of restaurant spaces with outdoor dining terraces following the outline of the existing built form from the Seidler masterplan.

Above these restaurants, two levels of boutique-scaled office, conferencing and wellness space follow the free-form plan and create a riverfront workplace experience unparalleled in Brisbane.

This riverfront built form is capped by an open landscaped terrace, accessed directly from the first level of tower offices. – Cameron & Co and Cox

Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

Project rundown

  • Site Area: 13,627m2
  • GFA: Office GFA: 35,073m2, total GFA: 38,548m2
  • Height: 26 storeys
  • Elevators: x10 elevators
  • Retail: Retail/ dining GFA: 3,016m2
  • Communal Space: 3,331.82m2 or 105% of the building footprint to be landscaped communal open space
  • Car Parking: Car parking numbers will be reduced within the existing Riverside Centre basement to allow for the establishment of end of trip facilities and bike store areas.
  • Bike Parking: 509
  • Developer: GPT Group
  • Architect: Cameron & Co and Cox
  • Landscape Design: Aspect Studios
  • Town Planner: Urbis
  • Sustainability: Roof top PV arrays are proposed to capture renewable energy and are accompanied by back up battery storage. Rainwater harvesting is also proposed. The development is targeting 5.5 Star rating under the NABERS tool and 6 Star rating under the Greenstar Buildings pathway.
  • Date Submitted: 01/12/2022
Architectural rendering of inside GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of inside GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT's 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City
Architectural rendering of GPT’s 135 Eagle Street, Brisbane City

Plans

Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006160274.

Subscribe to BrisbaneDevelopment.com here.

Cbus Property Proposes 30-Storey Residential Tower for Spring Hill

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Architectural rendering of the podium of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill

A development application has been submitted by Cbus Property for a 30-storey residential building comprising of 125 apartments located at 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill.

Designed by Rothelowman, the project features a unique truss and grid architectural style.

A full floor recreation deck is proposed on level 2 as well as a large subtropical plaza area on the ground level.

The double height recreation level, known as ‘The Conservatory’ is split into a range of zones which would feature a lap pool, spa pool, sun lounge area, turfed lawn area, BBQ area, gym and dining room.

Architectural rendering of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Architectural rendering of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Architectural rendering of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Architectural rendering of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill

A highly pedestrianised ground level is proposed which includes a new cross-block link from Wharf Street to Carrol Lane.

According to architect Rothelowman, the building has been designed with Brisbane’s subtropical climate at the forefront, adopting the principles of a front yard and backyard as its design ethos for the internal and external living space for every apartment.

Architectural rendering of the recreation deck of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Architectural rendering of the recreation deck of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill

“While aspirations of subtropical design manifest in Queensland’s renown bespoke residential detached architecture, they have not typically been accessible to people seeking higher density housing models.

In a local context, it is suggested that multiple dwelling architecture could benefit from the learnings prevalent in the ‘New Queensland House’ that are founded on Queensland’s strong domestic architectural history.

This is exemplified by an approach that considers flexible living arrangements, a strong connection between inside and outside and innovative use of materials in construction. These broader objectives are explored in the project at multiple scales that encapsulate the architecture, interiors and resident recreation amenity.” – Rothelowman

Structural diagram of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Structural diagram of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill

Project rundown

  • Site Area: 1,835m2
  • Height: 30-storeys / AHD 138.25m
  • Apartments: x60 two bedroom apartments, x45 three bedroom apartments, x20 four bedroom apartments (x125 apartments total)
  • Elevators: x3 lifts (lift-to-unit ratio of 1:41.6)
  • Retail: No retail space proposed
  • Communal Space: 1,407m2 in total
  • Car Parking: x246 spaces total (within 4 basement levels and 1 lower ground level), x233 residential spaces, x13 visitor spaces
  • Bike Parking: x125 resident spaces and x32 visitor spaces (x157 spaces total)
  • Developer: Cbus Property
  • Architect: Rothelowman
  • Landscape Design: RPS Group
  • Town Planner: Urbis
  • Sustainability: Significant sustainability initiatives. All electric building (no fossil fuels used for power, heating or cooking), a rooftop solar PV system to provide power to communal areas, rainwater harvesting, natural ventilation, EV charging and recycling chute and on-level collection. The building will be targeting a 5 Star Green Star rating and Nathers rating of 7.5 Stars.
  • Date Submitted: 30/11/2022
Proposed sustainability credentials of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill
Proposed sustainability credentials of 185 Wharf Street, Spring Hill

The subject site currently houses a small three storey commercial building.

According to the development application 185 Wharf Street will establish the Spring Hill Neighbourhood precinct as a re-imagined subtropical inner-city residential enclave.

Plans

Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006160080.

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Mixed-Use Development Proposed for Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower

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Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development
Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development

A development application has been submitted by Lantona 2 Pty Ltd for a mixed-use 36 apartment development located at 133 Eagle Terrace, 4 Grimes Street & 7 Ridley Street, Auchenflower.

Designed by Ellivo Architects, the development would provide a mix of 2 & 3 bedroom apartments across 12 storeys.

The unique site features three street frontages. To the north-east of the site, a 12+roof level residential building is proposed and on the south-west of the site, a shorter 7 storey commercial building is proposed.

According to the development application the proposed development represents a high-quality architectural design, with generous landscaping, communal and private open space areas.

The proposal seeks to provide 236m2 of high-quality communal open space consisting of leisure deck, swimming pool and grass areas on the roof of the residential building.

Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development
Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development
Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development
Architectural rendering of 133 Eagle Terrace, Auchenflower development

Project rundown

  • Site Area: 1,566m2
  • Height: 12+rooftop / RL 54.9
  • Apartments: x3 two bedroom apartments, x32 three bedroom apartments, x1 four bedroom apartment (x36 apartments in total)
  • Elevators: x1 lift in each building. Lift-to-unit ratio is 1:36
  • Retail: A small 16.2m2 cafe is proposed below the commercial building
  • Communal Space: Rooftop recreation deck with pool, sun deck, bbq area and seating areas
  • Car Parking: x89 resident car spaces, x10 commercial spaces and x9 visitor spaces (x108 spaces in total)
  • Bike Parking:
  • Developer: Lantona 2 Pty Ltd
  • Architect: Ellivo
  • Landscape Design: Laud Ink
  • Town Planner: Town Planning Alliance
  • Sustainability: Plantings on roof and podium. Water harvesting on rooftops. No provision for rooftop solar PV system.
  • Date Submitted: 19/10/2022

Plans

Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A005805334.

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Plans Released for Boutique Residential Building at 25 Maud Street, Newstead

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Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead
Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead

Apartment developer HG Developments has unveiled a boutique collection of premium apartments in their latest residential development AIRE Newstead, an eight level apartment building planned for the sought-after suburb Newstead North in Brisbane’s inner city.

AIRE Newstead is to be developed on a prime 1518sqm site at 25 Maud Street Newstead North, offering 30 oversized, prestigious private residences in a selection of two and three bedroom floorplans that can also include multipurpose rooms and studies, positioning them as some of the largest new apartments currently available in Inner Brisbane.

Designed by leading Queensland architectural firm bureau^proberts, AIRE Newstead presents a limited opportunity for Brisbane’s owner-occupier apartment market, with home sized apartments meeting demand for quality apartments with additional space in prime lifestyle locations.

AIRE Newstead’s market leading features include expansive floorplans much larger than other new projects in Brisbane. At a total of 160sqm, the two-bedroom apartments with multi-purpose rooms (MPR) at AIRE are more than a third times (36%) larger on average than other two bedroom apartments planned for Brisbane’s inner city.

Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead
Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead

All apartments at AIRE Newstead have much larger balconies than typically found in new apartments, with Aire’s entertainer balconies ranging in size from 28sqm to 79sqm, offering an average of 34sqm additional living space.

Generous car parking allocation is also notable compared to other new developments in Brisbane’s inner city, with all two bedroom plus MPR apartments having two car spaces, while all bar one three-bedroom apartments have three car spaces. The majority of three-bedroom plus MPR apartments all have four car spaces.

Prices for a two-bedroom plus MPR apartment start at $1,525,000 for 160sqm of floorspace (balconies included), while three-bedroom apartments begin at $1,875,000 for a total of 180sqm.

AIRE Newstead is being developed by HG Developments, one of Brisbane’s leading developers of boutique apartment buildings. Lead by Alistair Harvey and Simon Gundelach, HG Developments specialises in luxury lifestyle apartments in sought-after locations within Brisbane’s city fringe.

HG Developments has long identified Newstead North as one of Brisbane’s most accessible and upcoming inner-city precincts, with the release of AIRE to the market following the sell-out of their most recent residential apartment development Alouette Residences Newstead, being 57 apartments over 8 levels, that is now under construction by Hutchinson Builders.

Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead
Architectural rendering of AIRE Newstead

Simon Gundelach and Alistair Harvey saw AIRE Newstead’s 1518sqm site at Maud Street as a unique opportunity to follow the successful sales of Alouette apartments that sold out soon after its market launch and prior to construction commencing.

“The owner-occupier market is always our first priority when planning an apartment, as our goal is to consistently deliver luxurious and liveable inner-city apartments in prime locations where people actually want to live,” Mr Gundelach said.

“When we work with our design team, we are creating homes where we want to live. That’s why we incorporate extra living spaces, oversized balconies and generous car parking provision at all our apartment developments and at AIRE we are raising the bar even higher.

“Newstead North is an area of Brisbane popular with owner occupiers for its riverside lifestyle, and we have designed AIRE to fully complement the suburb’s unique features, taking inspiration from the surrounding parkland, the flow of the Brisbane River and all the vibrant places nearby with some of Brisbane’s best dining and shopping experiences.”

Luxury apartment marketing agency TOTAL Property Group is managing the sales of AIRE Newstead and is expecting high demand following the successful sales campaign of Alouette Residences Newstead, of which the team achieved a 100% sell out of apartments prior to construction commencing.

TOTAL Property Group Managing Director and AIRE Newstead Marketing Manager Adrian Parsons said the inner-city location of Newstead North was one of the most sought after residential areas in Brisbane, in demand for its riverside location and high level of walkability, being so close to Brisbane city and popular retail and dining precincts.

Mr Parsons says the owner-occupier apartment market that AIRE Newstead is designed for, has shown no signs of slowing down, boosted by South East Queensland’s continued population growth and the undersupply of new apartment developments.

“In the current market conditions, we see AIRE as a limited opportunity to purchase a brand new luxury apartment of exceptional quality in one of Brisbane’s best inner-city locations,” Mr Parsons said.

“Newstead North is an area of increasing high demand, due to its convenient location 3km from Brisbane’s city centre and within a short walking distance to popular retail and dining destinations Gasworks and James Street, along with excellent public transport and road network connectivity.

“The apartments offer market leading features, with an average of a third more space than comparable apartments, and this is even more competitive considering that Aire also offers the most generous car parking allocation, with all AIRE apartments having at least two car spaces, and more than three quarters of apartment having either 3 or 4 car spaces.

With only 30 apartments in this development being released to the market, this is a rare opportunity for people looking at purchasing a new, prestigious home-sized apartment in Brisbane’s inner city.”

Perfectly positioned at 25 Maud Street Newstead North, AIRE Newstead is located just 350 metres from Newstead Park and 2.75km from New Farm Park and Brisbane Powerhouse, one of the city’s most prominent cultural centres.

AIRE Newstead apartments provide outstanding opportunities with prices starting at $1.525million for two-bedroom apartments plus MPRs ranging in size from 160sqm. Three-bedroom apartments start at $1.875m for 180sqm and prices start at $3.05million for three bedrooms plus MPR spanning up to 225sqm.

Large Residential BTR Project Proposed for Woolloongabba

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Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development

A development application has been submitted by JGL Projects for a large 433 residential BTR (build-to-rent) apartment development located at 44 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba.

Designed by bureau^proberts, the development features a unique design which incorporates many varieties of heights and vertical expressions, forming what looks like many multiple towers. Despite this feature, the proposal however incorporates only two towers in a true sense.

The design of the development includes a series of rooftop areas at varied heights. This design nuance of the development provides an opportunity to for multiple rooftop recreation areas to be delivered.

Rooftop recreation areas are provided on each level of the proposed development from level 12 to level 19. This series of rooftop recreation spaces feature a high variety of active and passive recreation opportunities, including:

  • Two resident meeting areas / libraries
  • Multiple barbecuing and kitchen areas
  • Multiple private dining areas that may be booked by residents
  • A yoga and fitness lawn
  • Multiple lawns for pets
  • A 25m pool and associated sundeck areas
  • Numerous general recreation areas that are flexible in how they may be used by residents.
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development

The rooftop recreation areas for both towers are linked by two separate landscaped pedestrian skybridges.

“The high degree of inter-connectivity provided within different parts of the development, particularly communal open space areas, will ensure that the resident community of the development are afforded opportunities for casual interactions and will bolster a sense of community and familiarity with one another.” bureau^proberts

Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of the proposed rooftop of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development

The development also incorporate indoor communal open spaces on the upper ground level, which will contribute towards resident recreation, convenience, and amenity. The indoor communal open spaces provided include:

  • A coworking and study space for residents with an outlook to Jurgens Street
  • Two library areas for residents
  • Two cinema rooms as well as a music/games room
  • A wellness facility, including a sauna, gym, yoga studio, and massage room.

A newly created cross block link is also proposed which would connect Ipswich Road to Jurgens Street.

Architectural rendering of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development

Project rundown

  • Site Area: 4,716m2
  • Height: 14 to 20 storeys high / RL 75.9m
  • Apartments: 124 x studio dwellings, 133 x 1 bedroom dwellings, 168 x 2 bedroom dwellings, 8 x 3 bedroom dwellings (433 apartments total)
  • Elevators: x4 lifts per tower. Lift-to-unit ratio of 1:54
  • Retail: x3 main retail spaces have been allocated as well as a large co-working area with lounge. Combined retail areas (excluding resident amenities) are 741m2.
  • Communal Space: A significant amount of residential amenities including pool, dining room, lounge, bbq areas, games rooms, large gym at ground, rooftop yoga and fitness area, pets areas, resident’s library, co-working space, cinemas
  • Car Parking: x315 car parking spaces; 63 of which will be visitor spaces and up to 5 spaces will be dedicated to the Centre Activity uses.
  • Bike Parking: x274 resident bike parks on lower ground with x277 bike docks planned for the basement level including significant e-mobility charging bays.
  • Developer: JGL Projects
  • Architect: bureau^proberts
  • Landscape Design: Wild Studio
  • Town Planner: Urbis
  • Sustainability: Significant landscaping throughout the development including on rooftops. Solar PV array planned for communal energy consumption. x118 E-mobility charging docks proposed in the basement area including a large bike parking, wash and repair area.
  • Date Submitted: 18/11/2022
Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development
Architectural rendering of proposed 44 Ipswich Rd, residential BTR development

A basement residents workshop is also proposed which would include dog wash and pet grooming as well as maintenance sheds.

In total, the proposed development will provide over 3,875m2 of communal open space area and is over 80% of the area of the site.

According to the development application, the built-to-rent model would service the chronically undersupplied millenial market between 25 to 34 age with a strong professional component.

“The demographic and locational characteristics of the Woolloongabba area are highly responsive to, and supportive of, the characteristics aligned with the build-to-rent housing model. To this end, the proposed development will provide for an identified housing need (with respect to supply and typology) for the Woolloongabba area.” – Urbis

Plans

Proposed Plans

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Developmenti online platform is A006150645.

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