Large mixed-use development ‘Oro’ planned for Newstead

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Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead

A development application has been submitted by Panettiere Developments for a large 22 storey mixed-use development located at 75 Longland Street, Newstead.

Known as ‘Oro’, the primary use of the proposed development is 16 levels of residential apartments, followed by 5 levels of short term accommodation, 2 levels of commercial space as well as ancilliary commercial and residential facilities.

Designed by Urban Solutions Architects, the tower features a high degree of street activation with seven retail tenancies in total facing Stratton, Longland and Kyabra Streets.

The building would also feature a bi-directional driveway and will provide a new connection through the site from Longland Street to Stratton Street.

Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Proposed ground level plan of Oro
Proposed ground level plan of Oro

The project features a notibly long rooftop pool which would span 65 metres across the majority of the length of the building with 2x50m lap lanes, children’s wading pool, fire pit, in-pool seating areas, outdoor showers, x2 heated spas as well as sun lounges, umbrellas and landscaped gardens around the edges of the pool.

Proposed Oro rooftop plan
Proposed Oro rooftop plan
Level 19 plan of Oro
Level 19 plan of Oro
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' rooftop deck
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ rooftop deck

The rooftop deck on level 20 features a hotel pool bar / kitchen and dining, teppanyaki area, steam room, sauna, large gym, treatment room, bbq area and green turfed space.

Residents and tenants of the apartments will have access to communal open space facilities on the rooftop, whilst the pool bar / kitchenette will operate as a ‘hotel’ use open to the public.

One level below the rooftop is a mixed-use level which includes residential lounge and private dining space, cinema, function facility with bar as well as a 329m2 business centre / co-working office.

Oro building Facade upper levels Night Time View Illuminated
Oro building facade upper levels night time view illuminated
Oro building Facade upper levels Night Time View Illuminated
Oro building facade upper levels night time view illuminated
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' streetscape
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ streetscape
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' streetscape
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ streetscape
Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' streetscape
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ streetscape

Development rundown

  • Building Height: 22 Storeys, RL76.70m AHD
  • Ground Floor Tenancies: 712.7m2
  • Mezzanine and Podium Levels: 5,222.07m2
  • Level 19 Office: 336m2
  • Level 19 Function Facility: 360.5m2
  • Hotel: 130m2
  • Multiple Dwelling / Short Term Accommodation
    – 1 Bedroom: 20 Units
    – 2 Bedroom: 50 Units
    – 3 Bedroom: 15 Units
  • Apartment Dwellings (239 total):
    – 1 Bedroom: 8 Units
    – 2 Bedroom: 96 Units
    – 3 Bedroom: 48 Units
    – 4 Bedroom: 2 Units
  • Total of 417 car parking spaces including:
    – 319 resident spaces
    – 2 manager spaces
    – 36 visitor spaces (including 2 PWD spaces)
    – 12 retail spaces
    – 48 commercial spaces
  • Total of 354 bicycle parking spaces including:
    – 244 resident spaces
    – 72 visitor spaces
    – 38 employee spaces
  • Landscaping: Total 1,256.6m2 (38.1% of site area)
  • Communal Open Space: Total 1,200m2 (36.3% of site area)
  • Landscape architect: Form

According to the development application, efficiency and sustainability will be utilised in the technical features of the building (i.e. air conditioning, choice of lift, choice of fittings) in addition to the provision of bicycle parking, end of trip facilities, electric car charging bays, water tanks and solar panels on the rooftop.

Panettiere Developments, who is the developer behind another residential building in Newstead known as Nero, purchased the large industrial site for around $13.2 million back in 2018.

Architectual rendering of proposed 'Oro' mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead
Architectual rendering of proposed ‘Oro’ mixed-use development at 75 Longland Street, Newstead

The subject site currently contains a two storey commercial / industrial building that will be demolished to make way for the proposed development.

Plans

Plans-Opt

 

Tell us what you think about this development below in the comment box. The development application for this project, available to view on Brisbane City Council’s Planning & Development Online is A005590884.

6 COMMENTS

  1. This building appears to be very ambitious in design. The developer is throwing several different styles together that are very different for this area. It would be more suitable in the Gold Coast or Cairns.

  2. The large building in this street are creating a wind tunnel effect which makes walking and sitting out to dine unpleasant much of the time.
    Height limits need to be on a more human scale. Up to eight floors.
    The building has a middle eastern look to it which like many new buildings is not compatible with the Brisbane character.
    How sustainable is this large building?

  3. This is a terrible idea. Newstead is in danger of becoming a slum because there are far too many apartments available. This is too large and spectacularly ugly. It does not fit with the buildings around it, but exacerbates the worst of urban living. Longland St is already too crowded with people, pets and power vehicles. It used to be my impression that there was a limit of 14 floors for buildings in this area. Why is it that developers like to get cheeky and push that envelope. 14 floors might have been ok. But not 22.

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